Celery Plant Spotlight: Tips and Tricks to Grow, Cook, and Eat Garden Fresh Celery

Your garden and kitchen guide to celery

Introductory Facts and Trivia

Celery is originally a marshland plant that people have learned to grow in various settings and areas. While being useful cooking, it can also be used in herbal medicinal practices.

Grow Your Own

It is best to grow celery in a cool room-temperature climate. Celery can still tolerate colder and warm temperatures but too much of this can damage the growth process. In order to grow a large amount of celery with high quality, it is necessary to think about the soil type, as well as the irrigation and fertilization methods that are being used.

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Corn Plant Spotlight: Tips and Tricks to Grow, Cook, and Eat Garden Fresh Corn

Your garden and kitchen guide to corn

Introductory Facts and Trivia

Corn, also called Maize, is a grain produce that was first domesticated tens of thousands of years ago by the indigenous population of southern Mexico and the lowlands east of the Andes. As the irrigation methods developed over the years, the corn quality changed into what it is today and was eventually moved into what would become the southern and midwestern United States, which is why it is so culturally popular in those areas.

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Fava Beans Plant Spotlight: Tips and Tricks to Grow, Cook, and Eat Garden Fresh Fava Beans

Your garden and kitchen guide to fava beans

Introductory Facts and Trivia

This widely used crop comes from an unknown origin. It is very visually similar to the lima bean because of the size and color that they both have. One of the first places that fava beans appeared in is the Mediterranean regions of Italy and Iran. It is one of the oldest cultivated plants known, with its culture extending back to prehistoric times. It is from the pea or bean family, scientifically called Fabaceae. The flowers on this crop have a sweet scent that attracts pollinators such as bees. The fava bean is a cool-season crop and is usually planted during February and March in California for vegetable use and during September to November to serve as cover crops.

Grow Your Own

Fava beans can be planted to improve soil. But the really fun use is when it can be used for food. You can use a portion of your crop for culinary purposes and the other portion of it for compost biomass that will help the soil in your garden. Continue reading “Fava Beans Plant Spotlight: Tips and Tricks to Grow, Cook, and Eat Garden Fresh Fava Beans”

Garlic Plant Spotlight: Tips and Tricks to Grow, Cook, and Eat Garden Fresh Garlic

Your garden and kitchen guide to garlic

Introductory Facts and Trivia

Garlic is part of the onion family, along with leek and chive. Garlic is believed to be native to Central Asia and northeastern Iran, and interestingly enough, was known to ancient Egyptians, and has been used as parts of culinary plates and in medicinal practices. The majority of the worlds supply of garlic comes from China. It is flavorful, inexpensive and can last for months if stored properly.

Grow Your Own

Garlic is fairly easy to grow. Because it grows from October to May, it serves as a benefit to the rest of your garden that requires the summer for growing in a garden bed. The two types of garlic you can plant are soft-neck and hard-neck garlic. An easy way to remember a distinguishing trait is that the soft neck garlic is smaller and the hard-neck garlic is larger.  

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Green Beans Plant Spotlight: Tips and Tricks to Grow, Cook, and Eat Garden Fresh Green Beans

Your garden and kitchen guide to green beans

Introductory Facts and Trivia

Green beans, unlike other plants that are used for culinary purposes, are distinguishable because of the enclosing pods that cover the before the seeds inside have fully matured. It is very easy to grow them, and aside from all the nutritional benefits it has to the human body, it also has benefits to your garden. Green beans contain nitrogen-fixers which helps your soil become rich with minerals and nutrients that can help the rest of your plants and crops.

Grow Your Own

The beans do need the warm weather, and they will need to be picked to keep producing, so stay active and consistent with your gardening techniques. They will be small at first because of their dependence on sunlight and a warm climate, but eventually they will grow to be just right. Check on them every few days, and they can quite possibly get bigger as the conditions needed for their specific growth process begin to improve.

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Melon Plant Spotlight: Tips and Tricks to Grow, Cook, and Eat Garden Fresh Cantaloupe Melon

Your garden and kitchen guide to melon

Introductory Facts and Trivia

The cantaloupe melon is believed to have originated from Africa or Southeast Asia. You probably recognize it as the large fruit with a “scale-y” or “net-like” covering on it. After it was introduced to Europe, it became a popularly-grown crop in America by the end of the 19th century. Currently, China is the world’s largest cantaloupe producer and it has become a widely popular fruit across the globe.

Grow Your Own

It is best to start growing your cantaloupes around December or January, and they will be for harvest in and around July. In some cases, the harvest will last for only about 90 days, while in other cases, it will last until October. Because this is a warm-climate fruit, it is best to plant them towards the end in the middle or at the end of winter, so that they can grow properly during spring and summer. Also keep in mind that cantaloupes require pollination from bees, so any climate conditions that will keep away bees might slow down the crop’s growth process.

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Cauliflower Plant Spotlight: Tips and Tricks to Grow, Cook, and Eat Garden Fresh Cauliflower

Your garden and kitchen guide to cauliflower

Introductory Facts and Trivia

Cauliflower is a vegetable that comes from the Brassicaceae plant family. They are reproduced by seed and the are annual plants. This means that they take one year to complete its life cycle, from germination to seed production. You probably recognize this vegetable from it’s appearance: white with a slight yellow tint. As you know, they resemble broccoli in a lot of ways, besides the color. An interesting fact is that cauliflower is from the same plant family and species as broccoli and other popular vegetables such as brussels sprouts, cabbage, and kale. The vegetable was introduced to France in the 16th century, and was later brought as far as India by the British in the 19th century. From there, it began to spread throughout the world.

Grow Your Own

Harvesting your own cauliflower crop is quite difficult, but it is very fun nonetheless. Remember that planting them during the fall or during the winter would help the most with the vegetable’s growth. However, it is possible to plant it during the spring and have it grow from that point in the year. It usually takes around 3 months to grow them, and the time range can increase or decrease depending on the soil and weather conditions.

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Kale Plant Spotlight: Tips and Tricks to Grow, Cook, and Eat Garden Fresh Kale

Your garden and kitchen guide to kale

Introductory Facts and Trivia

Kale is a relative of cabbage that is grown because of their edible leaves. It is similar in appearance to cabbage, and is sometimes referred to “wild cabbage,” possibly because of how some kale can reach a height of six or seven feet.

It originated around the Mediterranean as early as 2000 B.C. By the 19th century, Russian traders had introduced kale to the United States and Canada, and Americans actually used it more for decorative purposes such as a functional ornament. By the beginning of the 21st century, people began to eat kale because of its nutritional value.

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Lettuce Plant Spotlight: Tips and Tricks to Grow, Cook, and Eat Garden Fresh Lettuce

Your garden and kitchen guide to lettuce

Introductory Facts and Trivia

Lettuce is a very common vegetable that is both grown and eaten. Interestingly enough, it is related to daisies, as lettuce and daisies are both part of the Asteraceae plant family. Ancient Egyptians were the first to cultivate lettuce in large portions, and by the 16th to 18th centuries, there were many varieties all over Europe. For a while, Europe and North America were the world’s largest lettuce suppliers, but since the end of the 20th century, China has been the largest supplier of the vegetable.

Grow Your Own

Usually, lettuce is seen as a cool-weather plant, so it is best to grow the crop in the spring or in the fall. Lettuce is best grown in loose, well-drained soil with a good amount of water and an abundance in nitrogen. Once you dig holes for the seeds with a shovel, add a nitrogen fertilizer before planting. If you have a heavy soil, such as clay, it helps to use homemade compost to improve the crops’ growing condition.

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Onion Plant Spotlight: Tips and Tricks to Grow and Cook for the Onion Gardener and Eater

Your garden and kitchen guide to onion

Introductory Facts and Trivia

The onion is a close relative to garlic and has a rich history in many countries throughout the years. The origin of the onion is unknown, as the wild onion is extinct. However, they were seen throughout the centuries all over Asia. The ancient Egyptians saw the onion as a symbol for eternal life because of the ring-shaped inside and spherical shape. In fact, the mummified body of Pharaoh Ramesses IV had onion traces in his eye sockets, along with other pharaohs, as onions were used in burial processes. Onions were present in many places, and were eventually taken to the Americas by European settlers, where they became a core vegetable in the New World.

Grow Your Own

You can grow onions from seeds, sets, or transplants. Seeds for homegrown transplants will give you the best variety of crop. Sets tend to bolt prematurely in some cases, and seeds do not have this issue.

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