The 12 Design Principles of Permaculture as Rules of Living

https://www.permaculture.co.uk/sites/default/files/images/permacultureprinciples.jpg

By guest author: Erin Meyer

(story originally posted on Land & Ladle on Medium)

There are 12 design principles in permaculture. I think they can be applied to daily life, work and play which will allow us to live happier and healthier, to work more effectively and to create a more sustainable world.

Here are the 12 principles:

Observe and interact.

Catch and store energy.

Obtain a yield.

Apply self-regulation and accept feedback.

Use and value renewable resources and services.

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Food Waste is the New Plastic Pollution

https://tinyurl.com/ycoyer9s

By guest author: Erin Meyer

(story originally posted on Land & Ladle on Medium)

Today, I went for a nice, yet hot, run and I decided I needed to spend some time on the foam roller afterwards. Netflix just released the newest season of “Orange is the New Black” so I turned it on and went to work on the foam roller. Mid-roll, in a particularly painful place on the IT band, I heard this, “Expiration dates are bullshit.”

Hold up. Did I just hear that?

I went back a few seconds and yes, indeed, Natalie Figueroa said, “Expiration dates are bullshit” in response to one of the guard’s complaint that the FBI has been using their break room for too long and his yogurt is in the fridge (and thus, nearing its expiration).

I couldn’t agree more. Expiration dates are bullshit. Best Before, Best By, Best If Used By and Enjoy By dates merely indicate food quality, not food safety. Sell By is meant to be used by store staff, not the consumer. This means that people are throwing away literally tons of perfectly good food because they think it went bad. That is bullshit.

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5 Eco-Friendly Moves You Can Make at Home to Help Slow Climate Change

This guest post is written by: Neil Stawski

Climate change is real, is supported by a vast majority of scientists, and will have devastating effects on our planet if we don’t slow it down and begin to reverse course. There is already ample evidence that climate change is negatively affecting our world, but there is hope. Everyone can make changes at home to help slow the tide. Here are some ways to do what’s right for your community and the world at large.

Change your water consumption habits

Don’t waste water. It’s a simple concept. But what can you do at home to promote conservation? Try one of these tricks:

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The Basics of Eco-Friendly Landscaping for Your Yard

Photo by Clem Onojeghuo on Unsplash

Having a beautiful lawn is a major delight of suburban living.  However, it can be difficult to maintain your lawn while also staying eco-conscious and conserving water.  If you can bear to part with your lawn, a no-yard landscaping design is a neat option and gives you creative reign over the layout with items such as stone pavers, water features, mulch, and native plants. Another option is to turn your lawn into an edible yard or food forest to harvest your own produce.

If you’d prefer to keep your lawn, then there’s no need to worry.  The following tips will help you keep ecology in mind at the same time as you make your lawn the crown of the neighborhood.

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Beet Plant Spotlight: Tips and Tricks to Grow and Cook for the Beet Gardener and Eater

Your garden and kitchen guide to the beet

Beets, which are native to Europe, are cultivated as garden vegetables, and are used in various dishes such as soups and salads. It is also used as a natural coloring agent. Aside from its use as a food item, the beet also functions as a source of sucrose that can replace tropical sugar cane, and are frequently used to make refined sugar.

Grow Your Own

Beets are primarily grown for their roots, which are most often dark red and globe shaped. Young beet tops can be harvested for greens, which work very well with salads. The older foliage can be cooked.

Beets grow best during the fall and the spring, where temperatures are shifting between moderately warm and cool, which allows steady and even growth. It is best to remember that beets are a cool-season crop. Beets grow best in a sunny position in light, well-drained soils.

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Composting 101: Scratching the Surface on Healthy Soil

Image from Pixabay

Written by guest blogger, Clara Beaufort of GardenerGigs.

Compost[ing]: Rich, nutrient filled soil formed by decaying organic matter. Used as an additive to gardens and beds and when planting trees and shrubs to enrich pre-existing soil.

That’s a down-and-dirty definition of the substance gardeners call “compost.” But there’s more to this miraculous material than meets the eye – or the nose, for that matter. Are you a gardening novice looking for a way to boost your physical or mental health? If so, then mulch can make your plants bloom like the proverbial rose. Let’s take a peek at this perennial topic and see what comes up.

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How to Get Your Kids Eating Vegetables Fresh from the Garden

Every parent knows how it can be a constant struggle to get kids to finish their vegetables, much less enjoy them. However, nutrition plays a major role in child development, and it’s never too late to teach your kids that eating healthy doesn’t have to be a drag. Try these tips to get your kids looking forward to eating vegetables.

Feed Your Kids What You Eat

We often think that kids are simply picky eaters and will only eat fatty, salty, and sweet foods.  Biologically, those foods (i.e. pizza, macaroni & cheese, chicken nuggets, hot dogs, PB & J, etc.) are appealing to children, but they will ultimately imitate what they see. A special kid’s menu may seem like an easy answer to get children to eat, but if they see their parents eating a balanced meal and they’re exposed to a variety of flavors early on, they’ll be predisposed to eat what their parents eat. Children will reject a new flavor and food and that should be expected, but zucchini doesn’t need to be drenched in butter or dipped in ranch to be enjoyed. If at first you don’t succeed, try and try again.

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Twitter Social Media Interns

GivingGarden is a local Davis startup with a big, global mission to grow communities around food and food around communities. We are focused on building local food and gardening communities with the help of technology. We specifically want to bring food knowledge and produce sharing into the 21st century with all the data and tools that are at our generations fingertips.

To do this, we launched our first local food and social gardening app in beta during the Summer of 2017 and are looking for interns to help us reach the communities we’ll be serving, including Davis and Sacramento. The app will use crowdsourced data to help gardeners grow the right foods based on their location and community, will enable gardeners and local food lovers to give and get extra home-grown produce, and it will grow communities around food, through profiles, knowledge-exchange and social tools. You can learn more about the app, the company and the founding team at GivingGarden.io.

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Branding (Instagram) Student Intern

Giving Garden is a local Davis startup with a big, global mission to grow communities around food and food around communities. We are focused on building local food and gardening communities with the help of technology. We specifically want to bring food knowledge and produce sharing into the 21st century with all the data and tools that are at our generations fingertips.

To do this, we launched our first local food and social gardening app in beta during the Summer of 2017 and are looking for interns to help us reach the communities we’ll be serving, including Davis and Sacramento. The app will use crowdsourced data to help gardeners grow the right foods based on their location and community, will enable gardeners and local food lovers to give and get extra home-grown produce, and it will grow communities around food, through profiles, knowledge-exchange and social tools. You can learn more about the app, the company and the founding team at GivingGarden.io.

More about the role:
As a Giving Garden Branding intern you will be working directly with the CEO, who has experience growing products and communities at companies like Xbox, YouTube and Flipboard.  You will also work with our lead designer who has created compelling designs for several local organizations. We are looking for someone to help us develop a visual style and branded content ideas for Instagram and other social media sites.  You will be working on writing, content production, and social media. We’d love to hear from those really interested in applying their social media savviness, improving there writing skills, building out a portfolio and getting hands on experiences. If you love to write, post, craft a great IG and you have a creative streak and a love for food, please consider applying!

Your hours will be very flexible: 5-10 hours a week, with 1 regular meeting bi-weekly (once every 2 weeks) and communication between meetings will be handled via email and Slack.

This is an unpaid internship, but you’ll get hands on social media, content marketing and community management training, continual mentorship and advice on career paths and growth, and valuable connections and experiences that will help you on your path to an awesome career.

You must have a photography portfolio or active Instagram feed (your own or one you manage) to share as part of your application.

You must also be deeply familiar with Instagram, hashtags, reposting, stories, etiquette, etc.

To apply, please send a resume/CV, a link to your photography portfolio or active Instagram feed (your own or one you manage) and a writing example or social handles you manage to interns@givinggarden.io

Facebook Social Media Student Intern

GivingGarden is a local Davis startup with a big, global mission to grow communities around food and food around communities. We are focused on building local food and gardening communities with the help of technology. We specifically want to bring food knowledge and produce sharing into the 21st century with all the data and tools that are at our generations fingertips.

To do this, we launched our first local food and social gardening app in beta during the Summer of 2017 and are looking for interns to help us reach the communities we’ll be serving, including Davis and Sacramento. The app will use crowdsourced data to help gardeners grow the right foods based on their location and community, will enable gardeners and local food lovers to give and get extra home-grown produce, and it will grow communities around food, through profiles, knowledge-exchange and social tools. You can learn more about the app, the company and the founding team at GivingGarden.io.

More about the role:
As a Giving Garden Facebook Page intern you will be working directly with the CEO, who has experience growing products and communities at companies like Xbox, YouTube and Flipboard. You will be working on writing, content production, social media, and community management and outreach. We’d love to hear from those really interested in applying their social media savviness, improving there writing skills, building out a portfolio and getting hands on experiences. If you love to write, post, craft a great IG and you have a creative streak and a love for food, please consider applying!

Your hours will be very flexible: 5-10 hours a week, with 1 regular meeting bi-weekly (once every 2 weeks) and communication between meetings will be handled via email and Slack.

This is an unpaid internship, but you’ll get hands on social media, content marketing and community management training, continual mentorship and advice on career paths and growth, and valuable connections and experiences that will help you on your path to an awesome career.

You must be deeply familiar with Facebook, Facebook pages and publishing, Facebook groups, connecting to Instagram, stories, etc.

To apply, please send a resume/CV and a writing example or social handles you manage to interns@givinggarden.io